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  • Vicki Trusselli shared a letter in the Group logo of To my younger selfTo my younger self group 3 months, 2 weeks ago

    "GO FOR THE GUSTO"

    A note to my younger self
    Dear Ms. Vicki Lawana,
    I realize you were raised with a double standard as the after affects of being born in 1949.
    You were born on September 18, 1949. The most popular song of that year was “RAGTIME COWBOY JOE” By Jo Stafford. The most popular movie was “MISS GRANT TAKES RICHMOND” starring Lucille Ball and William Holden. A comedy about a secretary who unwittingly helps her boss run a betting parlor.
    You have so much potential as a young woman. You were born with so many talents. However, you were told as a woman you had to buckle down take care of your man. You questioned that point of view by asking questions of all the family. You thought maybe you were born again, as you looked out your window counting the stars asking the universe why you were here in this house, with this family and now what? You hear a choir singing from far away, as though the angels answered your question.
    You grew up learning to play the piano for hours, writing music, singing the blues. Your mom and grandma were your biggest fans.
    But as time went on you were told you could not be a singer or none of the things you were interested in at that time. There were only four things a woman was allowed to do in 1949.
    1. Secretary
    2. Housewife, baby maker, home maker
    3. Nurse
    4. Retail clerk
    Then when your dad tried to teach you mechanics, your mom told you, “Baby girl, ladies don’t work on cars.” So, you went inside the house crying tears of pain because your poppa was your hero. Your mom did not know any better. Your poppa told your mom. “Honey, there will be a time when ladies do work on cars. At least I wanted to teach her the basics.”
    Your dad worked long hours except he never worked on a Sunday as that was his family time. Your poppa bought you all the latest rock n roll of the 60s and 70s. Music was the go-to for everything in your family.
    You visited a nightclub when you were 15, jumping on stage singing “I’m Sorry” by Brenda Lee.
    Of course, you were only 15 and your dad found you, pulled you off stage. Sometime after that you quit singing or playing the piano. That was devastating to you. You would sit in your room writing songs and lyrics listening to all the latest bands.
    You grew up in a male patriarchal society. A woman could not buy a house or car without her husband. You marched in parades for equal rights for women and civil rights for people of color.
    When the 70s arrived and the women’s movement had opened doors for women to go to college and not be codependent on their husbands. Your dad sent you to nursing school in 1969. You began college studying business management and journalism. You discovered you had a high IQ of 135. You remember back in 1967 you were told your IQ was 95 below average. You were being prepared to survive in a male patriarchal society where men were smart, and women were 2nd class citizens.
    You rebelled against this, but still loved men and not always choosing the best characters.
    I want to explain, Ms. Vicki, that you listened to everyone but yet kept going to college and aspiring to fulfill your dreams. You worked at the LA Times when you were 30. However, you were introduced to a dude by his brother that worked there. You married him, had two babies as you thought your time clock was running out. When you landed the job at The LA Times it was not about marriage or babies. So once again you lived your double standard. You were divorced in 1989.
    Then you worked with a dude in the music and film industry whom you married.
    You never really had to marry anyone or have children to fulfill your womanly desires.
    I tell you as younger self, finish your degree, don’t marry because you think you must, work hard, play hard, study hard. It’s your life. Then one day you would meet the artist who respects you as a human being not a 2nd class citizen.
    Write those stories, interview the same stars you interviewed with your man, but do these procedures as a woman, educated, strong and successful.
    I tell my younger self, Ms. Vicki, you are unique, eccentric, artist. You don’t need a man to make you a whole person. The truth be told it’s the men who need a woman to make them feel like a man.
    So as a young woman you can do anything your heart desires and use your own talents in your career not worried about your man. Your man will love you for your strong qualities not just a ragtime cowboy side kick, but as a partner in life, a friend, a lover.
    GO FOR GUSTO, MS. VICKI!
    The rock song of 2023 was “Angry” by The Rolling Stones. The best movie was “Love at First Sight” by Netflix. Have we changed in the last decades? Yes, there are many changes. We stream music and movies through the internet. Web no longer have to go to the theater or concerts to see stars.
    There is a group of people in America today who want women to go back to 1949. Ms. Vicki, please work not to let this happen. If there was a time machine I would like to sit and talk to my younger self to tell you, do not marry just because it’s the trend. Do not have babies just because your internal clock is ticking. Study, work, play but do it on your own please.
    Ms. Vicki, you love your kids and grands very much. Surly you know your kids and grands have so many choices as men or women. There’s a new future ahead. There’s a rainbow of colors spreading all over the land. The Earth turns in motion to the beat of eternity as learn to move forward for equality for all.

    Vicki Lawana Trusselli

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    • Omg Vicki! This is amazing! I am going to include it in our newsletter today! I also have always felt pressure to follow social standards even though I wanted a career. And that inner conflict certainly has taken its toll on me, and my relationships. I love your advice to your younger self. So cool that you worked for the LA times. And how frustrating it must have been to grow up at a time the world fully expected you to be something you are not. Thank you for sharing and thank you for being part of our family. <3 Lauren

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      • Thank you Lauren. Yes it was very frustrating for me. I survived. i just hope we do not have to go back to those times again. Growing up in those times was confusing for me as a woman of many questions and not accepting the status quo if it did not seem practical or was too controlling.

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