fbpx

Activity

  • Thank you, Lauren! I couldn’t pick just one favorite thing from 2023!

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • Maggie Faye responded to a letter in topic Poetry 2 weeks, 2 days ago

    This was so fun to read! My ADHD brain really appreciates the changes in pacing throughout the work.

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • VIII. Strength

    I was eighteen in my public speaking class, introducing myself as a lioness with a shake in my throat.
    She reminded me of my own strength when I needed her most:
    When I was dissociating away from my high school relationship,
    And dissociating into the arms of an abusive one.
    When with ferocious presence I left, and I rebuilt.

    When Roe v. Wade overturned and I’m on the phone with my father
    He rants about how many women must be so angry,
    But doesn’t hear how it made me feel.
    When he tells me I’m just like my mother like that’s a bad thing,
    With the lioness by my side, I left, and I rebuilt.

    With the flesh of my former self between my teeth,
    I destroyed and built again.
    With the pain of my foremothers suffocated under my paws,
    I destroyed and built again.
    With screams and aches and roars I didn’t know I had buried,
    I destroyed and built again and destroyed and built again.

    The blood of self-love drips from my jaw.
    The lioness and I are side by side and we are one.
    We have found safety at last.

    Maggie Faye

    Voting starts April 16, 2024 12:00am

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • Thank you for sharing this – I also have Graves’ though I was just diagnosed in December 2023. I’m sorry that this is something we’ve both been through, and thank you for voicing why advocacy is so important!

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • The Best Day

    The best day is a slow day at work. The best day is the day that the sun is shining, but it’s not too hot outside. The best day is the first day the temperature drops in September. The best day is the day I can give my baby a kiss. The best day is the day I belly laugh with my best friends until my cheeks hurt. The best day is the day I give my mom a hug. The best day is the day I am loving and kind on purpose. The best day is the day without anxiety; the day I can breathe through it. The best day is the day I start a new book. The best day is the day I finish my new favorite book. The best day is the day I start knitting, and every day I get to since. The best day is the day I get to go on adventures with the people I love. The best day is going to the Atlanta Zoo with my oldest sister and our partners. The best day is that same day, at the zoo, when a lion made eye contact with me (I swear it’s true!). The best day is in Boston, watching the second oldest sister graduate from Harvard. The best day is reconnecting with extended family for the first time in a decade in Boston. The best day is the day I went to the Hozier concert, and I was physically connected to the music and the message more than ever before and everyone in the audience was crying and it was beautiful. The best day is the day I realized my chronic illness is teaching me how to stop and rest. The best day is the day my cat decides he wants to snuggle in my lap before bed. The best day is therapy day! The best day is the day I realized I am healing; my hard work is paying off. The best day is the day I let myself cry in front of someone else. The best day is the day I realize I’m as smart as I think I am and, yes, I can prove it to you. The best day is the day I decide to be brave. The best day is the day I do the brave thing.

    Maggie Faye

    Voting is open!

    Voting ends December 4, 2024 12:00am

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

    • Maggie! This is wonderful. I love the zoo too 🙂 And congrats to your sister graduating from Harvard. This piece is a true reminder of the fact that there are so many wonderful moments and days in life. Thank you for sharing. And by the way, you are definitely brilliant and brave! <3 Lauren

      Write me back 

      Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • Maggie Faye responded to a letter in topic Mental Health 2 months, 3 weeks ago

    Thank you so much for your kind words and the recognition! I can’t wait to see the newsletter!

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • I am grateful for blue skies

    I’m grateful for blue skies, warm sunshine, and a breeze that kisses the nose.
    I’m grateful for green grasses and rushing creeks and bare feet.
    I’m grateful for friends and lovers that grab you by the hand and dance with you.
    I’m grateful for their consistent reminders, “You’re safe here. I love you.”
    I’m grateful for the forehead kisses my love gives me,
    And that he bends down to let me kiss his forehead right back.
    I’m grateful for the safety of my home, and I’m grateful for a newcomer’s compliments,
    “It looks like a gallery in here!” Thank you, the art is my favorite, too.
    I’m grateful, especially, for the rabbit posed in play, a floppy handstand,
    That’s been in our home longer than my memories. It’s one of my first ones.
    I’m grateful for the way the sun shines into my mother’s bedroom just before sunset in spring.
    It bathes the house in gold and it’s one of the most beautiful things I’ve ever seen.
    I’m grateful for the drums that echo in my chest at the concert in Alpharetta,
    And the music that reverberates in my bones. I’m grateful to have a body that feels the music.
    It’s exhilarating and soothing, an ecstasy I don’t need to swallow.
    I’m grateful for cats with soft fur and who love love love ear scratches.
    I’m grateful to my body and my brain for giving me the gift of sensation.
    Even when it’s too much, or not enough, I’m grateful to be present to feel.

    Voting is open!

    Voting ends March 15, 2024 11:59pm

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

    • Aww this is beautiful. It sounds like you have a very kind and affectionate partner. You are so very lucky for that. You really have a wonderful ability to recognize and appreciate what really matters in life. Thank you for sharing and thank you for being part of The Unsealed family. <3 Lauren

      Write me back 

      Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • Maggie Faye shared a letter in the Group logo of Mental HealthMental Health group 2 months, 4 weeks ago

    I wanted to be Hozier

    I was in awe of the whimsies and romance.
    I yearned for my art to comfort and soothe;
    For my art to hold the listener’s hearthurt the way my hearthurt was held,
    For my art to share imagery with songs of love,
    To create beauty in death as he created it.

    I wanted to be Hozier, but I have to be Poe, first.

    I have to walk through my Inferno to reach such actualization.
    My shadow still screams. Still cries.
    Pieces of my younger self scattered in nine circles.

    I have to talk to her and make peace with her.
    I have to parent her.
    I have to hold her.
    I have to become one with her once more.

    I will blood, guts, and gore my way through,
    Just as the horrors led my way in.
    The girl that wants to scream will scream and
    Embrace the gross and the weird and the upset.

    I will not become my own betrayer, no. So,
    I am no longer my own betrayer, mine own Nth circle.
    Treachery at mine own hands, no more.

    Maggie Faye

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

    • Maggie, This is really powerful. I love this part: I have to talk to her and make peace with her.
      I have to parent her.
      I have to hold her.
      I have to become one with her once more.

      Keep fighting for yourself and your happiness. Also, this piece was selected to be included in our newsletter today! Keep on the lookout for it! <3 Lauren

      Write me back 

      Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • I’m so obsessed with this!!! Thank you so much for your words. This is so so sooooo good

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • Maggie Faye responded to a letter in topic Poetry 2 months, 4 weeks ago

    I love this so much! The rhythm is upbeat and enjoyable and your words paint a beautiful picture. This is wonderful and thank you so much for this ❤️

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • I am not religious, but this this an absolutely beautiful testimony and nearly brought me to tears. Thank you so much for sharing and being so open with us. I feel like I know exactly what kind of man your father was without ever having met him, and even more I can see how much he means to you and how good he was. Sending love and happy thoughts your way ❤️

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

  • I still struggle with body dysmorphia

    Dear reader,
    I still struggle with body dysmorphia.
    But in 2021, I started wearing tiny clothes. For the first time ever.
    I’ve been many different sizes since my teens, but I’ve always been shaped the same. I was a chunky kid, or a curvy girl. Even in the height of my eating disorder, my bone structure never changed. The shape of my scapulae, the curve of my rib cage, or how close its end is to my pelvic bone’s beginning; these parts of me don’t move, so size didn’t always “fix” things. My fat distribution never changed much, either (hormone problems also contribute to that). I was always a “thick thighs save lives” girl with a big butt, even if there were less adipose cells than before.
    I felt deformed. Being raised in the early 2000s, this meant my whole life was a story of “Clothes Never Fit Right”. A story of my mom buying me women’s clothes at age 14 because the clothes my peers wore were too small. A story of being laughed at when I wore low-rise skinny jeans that gave me a “plumber butt”. A story of being called Britney Spears by a classmate because a button-up shirt I wore that day was a bit more form-fitting. (Which is a ridiculous insult, by the way. Britney is a queen.) It was also a story of seeing women being vilified for having a body that looked like a body. Every woman had to be paper thin.
    When I was 11, the 2007 VMAs splattered the news with Britney Spears’s performance. My dad nonchalantly said that Britney was “maybe skinny for a mom but still fat for a woman”. He said that to his 11-year-old daughter.
    I was insecure for so, so long.
    Then comes 2021. After a pandemic shutdown that kept most of us at home for months, I’m an adult. I’m well past the eating disorder. I’ve graduated college. I make my own money. Screw it, I’m now just going to wear what I want. I’m officially not dependent on anybody else.
    I wore Aerie leggings with a crop top. This was a new combination for me, and one that was trendy at the time. I was self-conscious at first; and worried about what my mom would think. She never would’ve let me leave the house wearing something like that growing up. I had been wearing the oversized T-shirt and Nike shorts combination for years.
    I definitely spent way longer than I want to admit still sucking in my tummy. I spent way longer than I want to admit worrying about the shape of my butt, or my thighs rubbing together.
    But it was so comfortable.
    So over time, I adjusted.
    My belly was out, every curve and line where everyone could see. My butt looked phenomenal. My thighs were being gently hugged by each other and the leggings with every step. Even my back rolls played peek-a-boo if I needed to reach something from a high shelf.
    You could see pretty much every part that I’d been forced to hide before. I was the most visible I had ever been.
    After a decade of either squishing everything in with Spanx, or completely hiding under a babydoll dress: leggings and a crop top freed me. I finally saw my body in real time. Every soft bit, I knew exactly what it looked like. I knew exactly what I looked like.
    It took a while to make peace with certain parts of myself. But I could finally look at every part of me and look at every part put together to form the whole of me and be okay with it. I could finally see me and my body without shame and contortion.
    My body dysmorphia is not gone. That part of me may not ever fully heal. But I made progress I’d never made before, because of this. Because of Aerie leggings and crop tops.
    This particular method may not be for everyone.
    This was the first of many times I’d leave my comfort zone. It definitely felt funny to start. Growth never comes without discomfort.
    Looking back now, though, it healed me more than I thought it did.

    Maggie Faye

    Voting is closed

    Subscribe  or  log in to reply

    • Maggie, While, based on my math, I am about ten years older than you, so much of this resonated with me. Those early 2000 years/late 1990’s thins was in, and I felt that same pressure, and I faced similar struggles as you. Someone said something to me while I was in college in NYC. She said, “Nothing looks as good as healthy feels.” That, somehow,…read more

      Write me back 

      Subscribe  or  log in to reply

Mange push notifications